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Innovation Digest – January 2018 vol. 1

The first January 2018 issue of the Innovation Digest is out! In this issue:

  • Well-Informed Patients Play a Key Role in Value-Based Care
  • The Envelope
  • Change Healthcare, Google Cloud team up on enterprise imaging solutions
  • Google: Doctors will be able to use speech recognition tech for taking notes
  • Improving Care And Lowering Costs: Evidence And Lessons From A Global Analysis Of Accountable Care Reforms
  • States Report Savings In Medicaid Test Coordinating Health, Social Services
  • States Report Savings In Medicaid Test Coordinating Health, Social Services
  • Our Flawed Health Care System: Philanthropy Can Give Consumers A Voice, A Stage, And A Seat At The Table


Fail To Scale: Why Great Ideas In Health Care Don’t Thrive Everywhere

Fail To Scale: Why Great Ideas In Health Care Don’t Thrive Everywhere | At the intersection of health, health care, and policy.

Source: Fail To Scale: Why Great Ideas In Health Care Don’t Thrive Everywhere

This is a great and timely commentary on why change in healthcare is so hard. Other examples:

  • Recent reports from the CDC reveal that hospitals still aren’t consistently lowering healthcare-associated infection rates, despite intensive education, guidelines, public reporting and regulatory requirements.
  • Slow and variable implementation of strategies related to stemming antibiotic resistance and addressing outbreaks of emerging infections like Zika demonstrate the challenge of developing common public health responses.
  • Despite common wisdom about the importance of treating the whole person, consistent integration of care, particularly for complex, chronically ill patients, remains elusive in many practices.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) pours money into efforts to stimulate innovation in health care delivery, quality measurement and defining value to drive healthcare reimbursement. These are noble pursuits, but as this article rightly points out, such efforts cannot yield national-scale, universally relevant solutions. It can, however, identify and test new strategies, connect them with outcomes and highlight the issues of patient preference, culture, local health trends and workforce that must guide translation to other settings and inform similar activities in other areas of the country.

Innovation and implementation support must be present locally, with the ability to help stakeholders adapt their efforts to nuances in leadership, culture, health status, infrastructure and market dynamics. National policymakers must embrace the fact that local solutions may be most sustainable locally, rather than force a “scale up” mentality that cannot succeed everywhere.



AHRQ Releases Success Stories Shown to Help Engage Patients and Families in Primary Care

AHRQ Releases Success Stories Shown to Help Engage Patients and Families in Primary Care

New success stories from AHRQ’s patient and family engagement project, Guide to Improving Patient Safety in Primary Care Settings by Engaging Patients and Families, provide demonstrated experience for improving patient safety in primary care:  Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center provided patients with access to their clinical notes, Bellin Health (Green Bay, WI) implemented a comprehensive model of team-based care in primary care leading to improved patient and provider satisfaction and First Street Family Health Center (Salida, CO) formed a patient and family advisory council that transformed the way the practice functions. While the patient engagement effort is underway, project components will be released over the next year to support primary care practices in their efforts to improve patient safety. Access all three success stories, and other resources for providers, practice staff and patients here, and learn more about AHRQ’s patient and family engagement in primary care effort at the project page.   

Source: AHRQ Releases Success Stories Shown to Help Engage Patients and Families in Primary Care



Inculcating the Patient Voice in the Development of Value Models

To have true utility, value models to assess the worthiness of treatments must have robust processes in place to incorporate the patient voice.

Source: Inculcating the Patient Voice in the Development of Value Models



Here’s how patients can take a larger part in their own care – The Washington Post

Figure out what you need. Tell your doctor you want to be involved. Look for good information.

Source: Here’s how patients can take a larger part in their own care – The Washington Post

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